Our Vision

A collective effort to increase sustainable ag production through diversification and improved soil health.

2023 Soil Health Conference Registration Open!

The 2023 Soil Health Conference will be held Jan. 24-25 at the Best Western Plus Ramkota Hotel in Sioux Falls! Keynote speakers include Dr. Kris Nichols, Rick Clark, Mitchell Hora, and Roy Thompson! There will be breakout sessions, discussion panels, award presentations and more! Join us for all the fun!

News & Events

Growing Connections: New app creates soil health social network

Growing Connections: New app creates soil health social network

By Janelle Atyeo For the South Dakota Soil Health Coalition PIERRE, SD – South Dakota farmers, ranchers and gardeners are making strides in improving soil health, and they’re willing to share what works and what doesn’t. A new app from the South Dakota Soil Health...

Volga 4-Hers Win Student Soil Health Video Contest

Volga 4-Hers Win Student Soil Health Video Contest

Volga students Caleb Barsness and Dane Olson won first place in the South Dakota Soil Health Coalition’s 2022 Soil Health Demonstration Student Video Contest. The two sixth-grade Sioux Valley Middle School students, representing the West Sioux 2 4-H Club, will be...

Conference speakers: Solving ag problems begins with the soil

Conference speakers: Solving ag problems begins with the soil

By Stan Wise For fifth-generation Indiana crop and livestock producer Rick Clark, soil health and regenerative agriculture are about stewardship. “You have to be good stewards of the land,” he said. “If you think it's OK to watch your topsoil blow away in the wind,...

Our Mission

The South Dakota Soil Health Coalition is a producer led, non-profit, membership organization that was created in the spring of 2015. The Coalition is governed by a nine-member board of farmers and ranchers from across the state and includes several staff members. Staff and board members strive to carry out the Coalition’s mission to “Promote Improved Soil Health” through education and research.

5 Principles of soil health

1. Soil Cover

Keep plant residues on the soil surface. Look down, what percentage of your soil is protected by residue? Erosion needs to be minimized before you can start building soil health.

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2. Limited Disturbance

Minimize physical, chemical, and biological disturbance as much as possible. You will start building soil aggregates, pore spaces, soil biology, and organic matter.

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3. Living Roots

Keep plants growing throughout the year to feed the soil. Cover crops can add carbon to the soil, providing a great food source for micro-organisms. Try to add a perennial to your system. Start small to find the best fit for your operation.

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4. Diversity

Try to mimic nature. Use cool and warm season grasses and broad leaf plants as much as possible, with three or more crops and cover crops in rotation. Grassland and cropland plant diversity increases soil and animal health.

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5. Integrating Livestock

Fall/winter grazing of cover crops and crop residue increases livestock’s plane of nutrition at a time when pasture forage quality can be low, increases the soil biological activity on cropland, and improves nutrient cycling. Proper grassland management improves soil health.

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Soil Health Benefits

Organic Matter

Builds organic matter which retains and cycles nitrogen and sequesters carbon; which in turn reduces fertilizer and fuel costs.

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Water Infiltration

Improves water infiltration and retention which helps to better manage the effects of flood or drought and improves trafficability.

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Water Quality

Healthy soils filter and clean water that moves through it, for improved water quality.

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Reduced Erosion

Stabilizes soil aggregates which improves resistance to erosion by wind and water.

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Wildlife Habitat

Enhances wildlife habitat and balances the biological community above and below ground.

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DID YOU KNOW?

Healthy soil will be key to feeding 9 billion people by 2050.

Earthworm populations consume 2 tons of dry matter per acre per year, partly digesting and mixing it to form healthy soil.

Healthy soil is made of about 45% minerals 25% water 5% organic matter and 25% air.

One teaspoon of healthy soil contains 100 million–1 billion individual bacteria.